OFM - TG-02-2007: Hotel Retrofit Building Audit (Single Storey Strip Motel/Hotel)

OFM Guideline

Office of the Fire Marshal

OFM logo

OFM-TG-02-2007
Hotel Retrofit Building Audit (Single Storey Strip Motel/Hotel)

January 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION PAGE

Abstract 3

January, 2007

OFM Section: Fire Safety Standards at (416) 325-3100

The reproduction of this guideline for non-commercial purposes is permitted and encouraged. Permission to reproduce the guideline for commercial purposes must be obtained from the Office of the Fire Marshal, Ontario.

ABSTRACT

This guideline is intended to assist hotel operators and owners, including their agents, to conduct an audit of a residential building that is a hotel establishment or a residential building that is part of a hotel establishment, where the building:

• is only one storey in building height, and

• does not contain a basement, and

• does not contain another major occupancy, and

• is not regulated by Fire Code Retrofit Sections 9.3 or 9.5

Article 9.9.1.2. of Retrofit Section 9.9 of the Fire Code requires the owner to prepare and retain a Building Audit. The purpose of the audit is to identify and describe the existing building features in relation to Section 9.9 requirements. The Building Audit must be completed by January 1, 2008. Completing a Building Audit will help an owner identify those areas that comply while also identifying those areas that may be deficient and require upgrading. The Building Audit must be retained by the owner and be made available to the Fire Chief or an Assistant to the Fire Marshal upon request.

The audit guideline is subdivided into sections. Each section is designed for use as a template suitable for documenting the degree of compliance or non-compliance with the applicable requirement(s) based upon review and analysis of the subject matter. Many of the sections also contain explanatory information relating to the requirement under consideration.

The guideline is intended for guidance only and is not to be considered a statement of law in this area.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

This guideline is intended for use involving a residential building that is a hotel establishment or part of a hotel establishment that:

q is not more than one storey in building height, and

q does not have a basement, and

q contains a guest suite(s), and/or other residential accommodations and/or building services, and

q does not contain any other major occupancies, and

q is not regulated by Fire Code Retrofit Sections 9.3 or 9.5

This audit guideline is not intended to be used where the building being audited is a hotel establishment or part of a hotel establishment that:

q is more than one storey in building height, or

q has a basement, or

q contains a room intended for storage that exceeds 200 m², or

q contains another major occupancy other than a residential occupancy.

In these instances, the Hotel Retrofit Building Audit (Comprehensive) guideline should be used to audit the building instead of this guide.

All underlined words and phrases in this guideline are defined terms. For the definitions, refer to Appendix B – Definitions.

For example, hotel establishment is defined in the Fire Code, meaning “a building containing a hotel and all subsidiary occupancies that are operated in connection with the hotel and includes all connected or adjacent buildings that are operated in connection with the hotel”. Hotel is defined as meaning “floor areas, a floor area or part of a floor area containing four or more suites that provide sleeping accommodation for the travelling public or for recreational purposes”.

Retrofit Section 9.9 Hotels was introduced in May 2006 as an amendment to the Ontario Fire Code under Ontario Regulation 144/06 made under the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997. The regulation’s effective date is January 1, 2007. A number of the requirements become effective on that date. However there are different intervals of up to 5 years in some instances to comply with other provisions.

Owners of buildings falling within the scope of the Section 9.9 Hotels are responsible for bringing their building(s) into compliance within the time frames as specified. These time frames for compliance are outlined in Article 9.1.3.1. of the Fire Code. The compliance schedule for requirements that come into effect after January 1, 2007, can be found in Appendix A – Regulation Compliance Schedule for Single Storey Strip Motels/Hotels.

In some instances the work required may result in material alterations to the building structure or to its systems, and may affect temporarily the use of spaces in instances where installations or alterations must be made within these areas. Building construction, including additions, renovations and/or demolition are always subject to the Building Code Act and its regulations. For this reason, should construction be necessary, a building permit may be required prior to undertaking remedial measures to comply.

1.1 Instructions For Using The Audit Guideline

Using this guideline will facilitate determining those portions of Section 9.9 that apply to the building so that appropriate analysis and documentation can be achieved.

The applicable provisions of Parts 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8 of the Fire Code apply to the subject building, however, unless referred to specifically in this guideline these provisions are not part of this audit process. It is the responsibility of the owner to comply with the Fire Code. The Fire Code may be accessed and downloaded from the Ontario Government e-Laws web site at https://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/070213?_ga=1.171144416.1973619563....

It is intended that the guideline be followed sequentially section by section as applicable. Using the audit guideline sequentially will ensure that the fire safety elements regulated under Section 9.9 will be appropriately assessed and the results documented. There are 18 sections in the building audit guideline. Each section reflects certain elements of the regulation’s requirements.

Some portions of the regulation and guideline may not apply to the hotel establishment under consideration. In these instances, by following the directions in the guideline, you will be directed to proceed to the next section or to a specified portion of the guideline. This will allow you to disregard those portions of the regulation and Building Audit that are not applicable in your circumstances. For example, if the building being audited does not have guest suites that share an interior corridor, sections 5.2, 8, 10, 11, 12 and 15 of the guideline will not apply.

The Building Audit can be prepared using a computer and Microsoft Word in a manner similar to working on any Microsoft Word document. To complete the audit on a computer, download the Microsoft Word file to your computer. Identify and save the file so that you can access it easily to work on. After working on the Building Audit save the changes you have made before closing the file. When you return to work on the document, simply open the file and carry on from where you last left off.

To conduct the Building Audit, carefully review each statement and examine the corresponding feature(s) in the building. After completing the analysis, document the appropriate response by checking (Yes ☐ or No ☐) and where necessary describe or list additional information as directed in the text form field provided following the asterisk (*). When inserting text immediately after the asterisk (*) the form field will expand as necessary to accommodate all text. Inserted text will be printed in the colour red. Form fields located in the tables are not identified by an asterisk.

To check a box using your computer, simply double left click your mouse while the cursor is on the box. Then select the ‘Checked’ under the default value, then OK. The box is checked.

Check Box Form Field Options dialog box

The guideline provides qualifying statements intended to determine if the section or subsection applies to the building being audited. By completing these qualifying statements, in some instances you will be directed to proceed to the next section or specified portion in the guideline. When you encounter this using the computer, a hyperlink is provided that you can click on with the left mouse button. Using this hyperlink will take you to the next section or area in the Building Audit. To return to your original place in the audit guideline, click on the forward key (⇒) or return key (⇐) located on the computer screen tool bar.

The requirements in the regulation that apply to a one storey building have been editorially modified into simplified statements and consolidated in this audit guideline. These statements facilitate comparing the regulatory requirements with the applicable building feature(s) under consideration. Once the comparison and analysis is completed, the results can be documented.

For ease of cross-reference to the actual regulatory requirements, many of the simplified statements or steps in this guideline contain the numerical reference to the Fire Code in brackets [9.9.2.3.(1)] and similarly, where applicable, to the Building Code [3.2.3.20.(1)OBC].

The Building Audit can also be prepared using a printed copy of this document/file. When using this format, print the Building Audit guideline on single-sided, 3-hole punched paper. Place the printed pages of the guideline in a 3-ring binder. When documenting your analysis if you encounter insufficient space after an asterisk (*) to insert the necessary details, the information can be written on the reverse (blank) side of the page.

1.2 Definitions Of Words And Phrases

To assist in becoming familiar with the words and phrases that have special meanings in the context of this Building Audit guideline and the Fire Code, defined words and phrases have been underlined (i.e. building area) and provided with a hyperlink to the corresponding definition. To use the hyperlink, scroll over the hyperlink and left click on your mouse button. To return to your original place in the guideline, use the return key feature on your tool bar as previously described. Pleas note the meaning of word building. The word building in the guideline is synonymous with the building that is subject of the Building Audit. Due to the prevalence of this word in the guideline, it is not provided with a hyperlink for the remainder of the document.

Persons preparing the Building Audit must be fluent with the meanings of the words and phrases that are assigned special definitions. For those using a paper version of the Building Audit guideline, the definition of each word or phrase that is underlined can be found in Appendix B – Definitions.

2.0 GENERAL BUILDING INFORMATION

Complete the table below by providing the information relating to the building that is the subject of this audit. A separate audit must be prepared for each building that is part of a hotel establishment.

Hotel Municipal Address

*

Hotel Name and/or name of the building within a hotel establishment

*

Owner

*

Phone # *

Owner’s Municipal Address

*

Fire Department Name

Fire Department Municipal Address

Fire Department Contact

*

Phone # *

3.0 DETERMINE THE BUILDING AREA

Before you proceed any further with this guideline, it is necessary to determine the building area of the building being audited. Calculate the building area by determining the greatest horizontal area of the building above grade within the outside surface of exterior walls.

The building area is *m².

Now that the building area has been determined and you are aware of the importance of defined words and phrases, return to the Introduction portion of the guideline to ensure that the building being audited falls within the scope of this guideline.

4.0 SMOKE ALARMS IN GUEST SUITES

Smoke alarms are required to be installed in each guest suite by July 1, 2008.

The smoke alarm requirements include references to three different ULC standards. The following table contains a synopsis of the regulatory requirements outlined in Section 9.9 and those requirements contained in the referenced standards. For accurate reference, refer to the regulation and applicable standards. For correct placement of smoke alarms, refer to the illustration below.

Column 1 in the table describes the requirements. Column 2 is used to document compliance or non-compliance. Column 3 is used to describe details of non-compliance when applicable. Examine each guest suite to determine compliance with the smoke alarm requirements. Document your observations in the table as appropriate.

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

[9.9.4.13.] Requirements for smoke alarms:

Complies

(Agree)

Describe nature of non-compliance

Yes

No

Installed in each guest suite.

Each is ULC labelled.

Battery operated, or

Have permanent connections to an electrical circuit, and has no disconnect switches between the overcurrent device and the smoke alarm.

Not installed near an air outlet from a heating or air-conditioning system.

Permanently installed on the ceiling not less than 100 mm from any wall measured to the nearest edge of the smoke alarm, or on the wall with the top edge of the smoke alarm 100 to 300 mm from the ceiling.

Installed at least 1 m from the centre of a laundry room or bathroom entrance door to avoid exposure to water vapour.

Located on the high side of the room where the ceiling slope is greater than 1 in 8.

Installed on the bottom of the joists or beams where the ceiling consists of exposed joists or beams.

diagram of acceptable installation of smoke alarm

5.0 IDENTIFY AND ASSESS THE QUALITY OF REQUIRED FIRE SEPARATIONS WITHIN FLOOR AREAS

Time Saving Tip: Before proceeding to examine each of the fire separations specified in this section, it is suggested that you review Section 5 and Section 6 in their entirety. Section 6 involves an assessment of the protection provided for openings in required fire separations. Openings in fire separations are protected with closures, which may consist of doors, wired glass assemblies, glass block assemblies, fire dampers, etc.

After reviewing Sections 5 and 6, it may be possible to carry out the assessment/analysis of the applicable areas simultaneously.

Fires can start in any room or area in a building. To limit the spread of fire in a floor area the regulation requires certain rooms or areas to be enclosed with fire separations to protect the room or space from fire entering it, or to prevent fire from spreading beyond the room should it be the location of fire origin (refer to Figure 2).

This section of the audit involves the examination of required fire separations (wall assemblies and abutting roofs or ceilings) located between:

guest suites and adjacent rooms (or other areas)

• corridors serving guest suites and adjacent rooms

• laundry rooms, storage rooms and maintenance shops, and the remainder of the building

• rooms containing fuel-fired appliances and the remainder of the building

Figure 2: fire separations

It is important to note that the fire-resistance rating of an assembly is based upon all of the components of the assembly. The individual elements in themselves do not have a fire-resistance rating.

Fire separations must be constructed as a continuous element to act as a barrier against the spread of fire. A fire separation is required to be continuous and extend from one fire separation to another or to an exterior wall or roof.

For example, where a ceiling consists of a T-Bar ceiling assembly, a vertical fire separation that requires a fire-resistance rating must extend through the concealed ceiling space to abut the roof so that a smoke-tight joint is provided (refer to Figure 3). Extending the vertical fire separation to the underside of the T-bar ceiling assembly will not prevent smoke and fire spread (refer to Figure 4).

The use of gypsum wallboard or lath and plaster affixed to the underside of joists generally provides a proper abutment for vertical fire separations. Appropriate fire stopping is essential to retard the passage of smoke and flame, particularly at locations where a vertical fire separation meets a floor or roof assembly (refer to Figure 5).

t-bar ceiling assembly, acceptable

t-bar ceiling assembly: not acceptable

Figure 5 Acceptable

Existing wall assemblies deemed to provide at least a 45 min fire-resistance rating are described in the following table:

Acceptable existing wall assemblies

Reinforced concrete or masonry

Clay tile with plaster and lath or gypsum board finish on both sides

Assemblies with membranes consisting of lath and plaster

Assemblies with membranes consisting of gypsum board

Without a more detailed analysis, wall assemblies consisting of other types of materials and/or membranes are not designated by the regulation as having an inherent fire-resistance rating. Fire separations of this nature are required to have a fire-resistance rating conforming to Subsection 3.1.7. and Articles 3.1.8.1., 3.1.8.2., 3.1.8.3. and 3.5.4.2. of the 1994 Building Code (more recent editions of the Building Code also provide similar information).

These 1994 Building Code requirements outline how a material, assembly of materials or a structural member may be assigned a fire-resistance rating on the basis of other criteria. In circumstances of this nature, it is suggested that a competent professional in the building trade industry be consulted to assist in the analysis and/or design of the fire separation(s) under consideration.

5.1 Fire Separation Between Guest Suites And Adjacent Rooms Or Areas

[9.9.2.8.(1)] Guest suites are required to be fire separated from adjacent rooms and areas on the same floor area by fire separations having a 30 min fire-resistance rating or equivalent.

Existing fire separations are deemed to be acceptable provided they are continuous and the building is sprinklered.

This building is sprinklered. (NOTE: The sprinkler system must conform to Article 9.9.5.4.) Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Subsection 5.2. Where ‘No’ continue.

Existing wall assemblies deemed by the regulation to be acceptable are described in the table below.

An analysis of the existing wall assemblies fire separating guest suites from adjacent rooms are continuous and consist of:

Agree:

Reinforced concrete or masonry

☐ Yes ☐ No

Clay tile with plaster and lath or gypsum board finish on both sides

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of lath and plaster

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of gypsum board

☐ Yes ☐ No

Where applicable, list the guest suite(s) that do not have one or more of the wall assemblies described above fire separating them from adjacent rooms. *

5.2 Fire Separation Between Corridors Serving Guest Suites And Adjacent Rooms

Guest suites have interior corridors serving them as a means of egress.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 5.3. Where ‘Yes’ continue.

[9.9.2.8.(2)] Corridors serving guest suites must be separated from adjacent rooms and areas on the same floor area by fire separations having a 30 min fire-resistance rating.

Existing fire separations are deemed to be acceptable provided they are continuous and the building is sprinklered.

This building is sprinklered. (NOTE: The sprinkler system must conform to Article 9.9.5.4.)

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Subsection 5.3. Where ‘No’ continue.

Existing wall assemblies deemed by the regulation to be acceptable are described in the table below.

An analysis of the existing wall assemblies fire separating corridors (serving guest suites) from adjacent rooms are continuous and consist of:

Agree:

Reinforced concrete or masonry

☐ Yes ☐ No

Clay tile with plaster and lath or gypsum board finish on both sides

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of lath and plaster

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of gypsum board

☐ Yes ☐ No

Where applicable, list the area or portion of a corridor (serving guest suites) that does not have one or more of the wall assemblies described above fire separating the corridor from adjacent rooms. *

5.3 Between Laundry Rooms, Storage Rooms, Maintenance Shops And The Remainder Of The Building

The building contains one or more:

• Laundry room(s) Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ list the locations of each. *

• Storage room(s) exceeding 0.6 m² in area Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ list the locations of each. *

• Maintenance shop(s) Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ list the locations of each. *

Where ‘No’ is the response in all three instances above proceed to Subsection 5.4. Where ‘Yes’, continue.

[9.9.2.11.] Laundry rooms, storage rooms exceeding 0.6 m2 in area, and maintenance shops are required to be fire separated from the remainder of the building by fire separations having a 45-min fire-resistance rating.

Existing wall assemblies deemed by the regulation to be acceptable are described in the table below.

An analysis of the existing wall assemblies fire separating laundry rooms, storage rooms or maintenance shops from adjacent rooms are continuous and consist of:

Agree:

Reinforced concrete or masonry

☐ Yes ☐ No

Clay tile with plaster and lath or gypsum board finish on both sides

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of lath and plaster

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of gypsum board

☐ Yes ☐ No

Where applicable, list the rooms that do not have one or more of the wall assemblies described above fire separating them from adjacent rooms. *

5.4 Between A Room(s) Containing A Fuel-Fired Appliance And The Remainder Of The Building

[9.9.2.12.] Fuel-fired appliances must be fire separated from the remainder of the building by a fire separation having a 1-hr fire-resistance rating, with the exception of the following:

• fuel-fired appliances located within guest suites that only serve the guest suite,

• cooking appliances,

appliances installed on the roof of a noncombustible building,

• fireplaces and space heaters that are not located in an exit or in a corridor serving as an access to exit for guest suites,

• fuel-fired appliances contained in a building that is not more than 400 m² in building area [for consistency with 1994 OBC 3.5.2.2.(2)(b)]

The building contains fuel-fired appliance(s) in locations other than those described in the exceptions listed above. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Section 6.0. Where ‘Yes’ continue.

Identify and list the rooms containing a fuel-fired appliance that must be fire separated from the remainder of the building. *

Examine the existing wall assemblies for each of the rooms listed above to determine if they are acceptable.

Existing floor assemblies deemed to provide at least a 1-hr fire-resistance rating are described in the following table:

An analysis of existing wall assemblies fire separating rooms containing fuel-fired appliances are continuous and consist of:

Agree:

Reinforced concrete or masonry

☐ Yes ☐ No

Clay tile with plaster and lath or gypsum board finish on both sides

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of lath and plaster

☐ Yes ☐ No

Assemblies with membranes consisting of gypsum board

☐ Yes ☐ No

Where applicable, list the areas that do not have existing walls assemblies described above. *

Required Combustion Air

[9.9.2.15.(5) & (6)] In each instance where the appliance is fire separated or will have to be fire separated in conformance with the requirements specified above, sufficient combustion air must be brought directly form the outside for the safe operation of the appliance. Where it is impractical to provide combustion air directly from the outside as required, an alternative means for the safe operation of the appliance may be approved.

Provide details of compliance or non-compliance. *

6.0 PROTECTION OF OPENINGS IN REQUIRED FIRE SEPARATIONS

[9.9.2.10.] Openings in required fire separations are required to be protected with suitable closures to limit the spread of fire through the opening from one fire compartment to another.

This section involves identifying openings in required fire separations and identifying the types of closures and hardware that is provided or not provided for the protection of the openings. The regulation requires certain types of closures to be provided.

Closures can consist of a variety of materials. The closures can be permanently mounted in the fire separation and be fixed shut (i.e. wired glass window, glass blocks, etc.) or they may be capable of being opened or closed when necessary (i.e. door, shutter, fire damper, etc.).

When closed, closures limit the spread of fire by virtue of their physical construction blocking off the opening.

6.1 Determine The Adequacy Of Closures In Required Fire Separations

The following table identifies a variety of existing closures that may be present in openings in required fire separations in the building. In the table:

• Column 1 assigns a reference number to each type of closure. The assigned reference numbers will be used when completing the next table.

• Column 2 describes the closure or the label affixed to the closure.

• Column 3 identifies the fire-protection rating correspondingly assigned to the type of closure described in column 2. In column 3 ‘None’ means that the corresponding type of closure does not have a fire-protection rating.

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Assigned Reference Number

Description of Closure

Fire-Protection Rating assigned

1

Closures that have a permanent label attached identifying their listed fire-protection rating. These can include:

1 (a)

20 minute labelled

20-min

1 (b)

¾-hr labelled

45-min

1 (c)

1-hr labelled

1-hr

1 (d)

1.5-hr labelled

1.5-hr

1 (e)

2-hr labelled

2-hr

1 (f)

3-hr labelled

3-hr

2

Hollow metal or kalamein doors in hollow metal frames (with openings, if any, protected by wired glass)

1-hr or less

3

Any closure with openings consisting of other materials (i.e. plain glass) or having louvered grills

None

4

Permanently fixed shut wired-glass in steel frames or glass block assemblies

1-hr or less

5

Glazed (glass) panels fixed shut or capable of being opened

None

6

1¾ inch (45mm) solid core wood or tubular core wood door in solid wood or hollow metal frames

20-min

7

Hollow core wood doors, or doors consisting of recessed wood panels of less than 1¾ inch (45 mm) thick

None

8

Describe where applicable other types of closures when encountered that are not described above.

The information provided in the table above will be used to complete the assessment of closures in the locations specified in the table below. Use the table below to document the circumstances relating to the existing closures in required fire separations.

In the table below:

• Column 1 identifies the rooms or areas in the building that are subject to the examination. Where the building does not contain the room(s) specified, indicate that it is not applicable, by checking the box.

• Column 2 identifies the fire-protection rating of the closure that is required to protect the opening.

• Columns 3 and 4 are completed based upon the examination of the existing closure and hardware. Insert in the space provided the appropriate information as it is described in the table above.

• Column 5 is used to record closures that do not comply.

Where different types of closures are present that are not identified in the table above, identify their locations so that they can be re-examined to determine their degree of compliance or non-compliance.

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Column 5

Closures in fire separations located between:

Minimum fire-protection rating of closure & hardware required [9.9.2.10]

Identify type(s) of existing closure(s) present in fire separations

Identify the fire-protection rating of the existing closure

List location(s) of any closures that do not comply

guest suites and other guest suites or other spaces (but not corridors – see below)

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.8.(1)]

• 20-min (no fire-protection rating is required if floor area is sprinklered NOTE 2)

• self-closer

corridors serving guest suites and other rooms/areas

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.8.(2)]

• 20 min (no fire-protection rating is required if floor area is sprinklered NOTE 2)

• self-closer

laundry room(s) and other areas

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.11.]

• 20 min

• self-closer

• latch

storage room(s) (exceeding 0.6m² in area) and other areas

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.11.]

• 20 min

• self-closer

• latch

 

 

 

maintenance shop(s) and other areas

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.11.]

• 20 min

• self-closer

• latch

 

 

 

rooms containing fuel-fired appliances and the remainder of the building (excluding those areas listed in NOTE 1).

Not Applicable:☐

[9.9.2.12.]

• 45 min

• self-closer

• latch

NOTES:

(1) Excluding fireplaces and space heaters provided the appliance is not located in an exit or in a corridor serving as an access to exit for guest suites.

(2) The sprinkler system must conform to Article 9.9.5.4.

7.0 PIPES, DUCTS AND PLENUMS SERVING HEATING AND AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS

Piping, ducts and plenums (a plenum is a chamber forming part of an air duct system) associated with heating, ventilating and air conditioning can contribute to fire spread, especially where elements are combustible or contain combustible materials.

The building contains a heating system that serves more than one suite and consists of:

• a hot water or steam radiant heating system utilizing piping

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• and/or a heating, ventilating or air-conditioning system utilizing ducts, plenums or piping to move air.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ was the response to each of the two statements above, this section is not applicable, so proceed to Section 8.0. Where ‘Yes’ is the response to either of the above, continue.

Subsections 7.1. and 7.2 involve an examination and assessment of ducts, piping and ceiling spaces used as plenums. It also involves an examination of a heating system(s) utilizing pipes such as a hot water or steam radiant heating system. The purpose of this section is to identify factors that could increase fire spread involving this equipment.

7.1 Combustibility And Flame Spread Of Pipes, Ducts And Plenums

[9.9.2.16.(1)] Pipes, ducts, plenums and other equipment in heating and air handling systems shall be constructed of steel, approved noncombustible material or other approved material.

For the purpose of Subsections 7.1 and 7.2, “noncombustible” would include materials such as steel, galvanized steel and aluminums. “Combustible” materials would include wood, drywall, plastics, etc. and pipes, ducts or plenums constructed from these materials would also be considered combustible.

Heating or air handling systems constructed of aluminum (a noncombustible material) or drywall (a combustible material) could be approved.

This subsection involves an examination of the pipes, ducts and plenums serving all heating and air handling systems to determine what type of material the system consists of. As indicated in the requirement, other types of combustible or noncombustible materials may be approved. To obtain approval, information relevant to the circumstances must be submitted to the Chief Fire Official for consideration.

Summary of Analysis

The examination of the heating system(s) in the building revealed that some elements consist of materials other than steel. Describe the material(s) and identify the respective location(s). *

[9.9.2.16.(2)] Insulating materials and adhesives for pipes, ducts, plenums and other components of heating and air handling systems are of noncombustible material or have a flame-spread rating of 25 or less. (Section 11.0 contains useful information relating to flame-spread ratings of certain materials.) Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ describe the variance and location. *

[9.9.2.16.(3)] Where an attic space, a crawl space, a corridor ceiling space or other concealed space is used as a plenum, (Applicable: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 7.2.) the concealed space is lined with noncombustible material, or the material has a flame-spread rating of 25 or less. (Section 11.0 contains useful information relating to flame-spread ratings of certain materials.)

After analysis, it has been determined that the concealed space used as a plenum is lined with noncombustible material or has a flame-spread rating that does not exceed 25.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ or the materials are in question, describe the variance(s) and location(s). *

7.2 Fire Dampers In Ducts

[9.9.2.10.(7) & (8) ] Existing noncombustible ducts that penetrate a required fire separation are exempt from having fire dampers installed where they penetrate a required fire separation. This exemption conversely means that fire dampers must be provided in combustible ducts at penetrations of a required fire separation.

Upon analysis, it was determined that all ducts are constructed of noncombustible materials.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Section 8.0.

Where ‘No’ describe the location(s) of the combustible ducts that penetrate a required fire separation. *

Where a combustible duct(s) penetrates a required fire separation in a wall assembly, the opening is protected with a fire damper.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ describe the location(s) where a fire damper(s) is not provided. *

8.0 MEANS OF EGRESS

Subsections 8.1 through 8.4 examine the means of egress provided for the escape of occupants from guest suites or rooms (not within a suite) intended for occupancy, and from the floor area.

Subsection 9.9.3. of the Fire Code prescribes a variety of acceptable egress facilities for certain circumstances. Where a room or guest suite fails to satisfy one of these provisions, then the egress facilities for that room or guest suite must be improved in order to comply.

[9.9.3.2.(1)(a) & (b)] Each suite, guest suite or room (not within a suite) intended for occupancy has egress facilities leading directly outside (refer to the following illustration) to a public thoroughfare or an open space* that has access to a public thoroughfare.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Section 9.0. Where ‘No’ continue.

(*An open space such as an enclosed court yard that has access to a public thoroughfare and is used as a required egress facility must be approved.)

Egress to exterior

8.1 Egress From Suites, Guest Suites and Rooms Not Within A Suite

[9.9.3.2.(5)(c)] The building has at least one suite, guest suite or room (not within a suite) intended for occupancy that exceeds 100 m² in area. Applicable: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’, proceed to Subsection 8.2.

Where ‘Yes’, the subject room(s) or space(s) has two egress doorways placed in such a manner that one doorway could provide egress from the room(s) or area(s) if the other doorway becomes inaccessible to the occupants due to a fire originating in the room(s) or area(s).

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’, describe/list the location(s) and circumstance(s).

*

8.2 Corridors

[9.9.3.2.(1)(c)] Every suite, guest suite or room (not within a suite) intended for occupancy, that does not have egress directly to the exterior, has a door leading directly into a corridor where it is possible to go in opposite directions to separate exits. Refer to ‘Corridor A’ in the following illustration.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Subsection 8.3. Where ‘No’ continue.

[9.9.3.2.(2),(3)] A dead end corridor (refer to ‘Corridor B’ in the following illustration) is permitted to serve a suite, guest suite or room (not within a suite) that is intended for occupancy provided:

• the areas served by the dead end corridor have a combined occupant load of not more than 24 persons. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

and

• the dead end portion of the corridor(s) is not longer than 6 m plus the width of the corridor. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ is the response to both questions above, proceed to Section 9.0.

Where ‘No’ is at least one response, describe/list the location(s) and circumstance(s). *

Corridor egress

8.3 Distance Between Exits

[9.9.3.3.(5)] Where an interior corridor(s) is required to be served by two exits, the minimum distance between exits is 9 m or half the maximum diagonal dimension of the floor area, whichever is less. Refer to the following illustration for clarification. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’, proceed to Subsection 8.4. If ‘No’, continue.

[9.9.3.3.(6)] The floor area is divided by a fire separation having a 45 min fire-resistance rating so that it is necessary to pass through the fire separation to travel from one exit to another exit. Refer to the following illustration for clarification.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’, describe the area(s) where non-compliance is evident. *

Distance between exits

8.4 Travel Distance to an Exit

[9.9.3.5.(1)] Where an interior corridor serves as an access to exit, the travel distance to at least one exit does not exceed:

• 30 m in a floor area that is not sprinklered Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ , or

• 45 m in a sprinklered floor area. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ (Where applicable, the sprinkler system must conform to Article 9.9.5.4.)

Where applicable and the response is ‘Yes’ proceed to Section 9.0. Where ‘No’ to either of the above, the area in question does not comply. Refer to the illustration above for clarification. Describe the area(s) where non-compliance is evident. *

9.0 DOORS IN ACCESS TO EXITS AND EXIT DOORS

This section involves an assessment of the doors in access to exits and exits to determine if the doors are suitable for the prompt use of occupants to escape in an emergency.

Article 9.9.3.8. requires that each exit door and door providing access to exit shall conform with Subsection 2.7.2. of the Fire Code.

For ease in completing this section, the following statements have been compiled to reflect the intent and requirements of Subsection 2.7.2. of the Fire Code that apply to a building that is the subject of this audit.

[2.7.2.1.(1)] Every exit door is installed so that, when the latch is released, the door will open in the direction of exit travel without significant resistance upon application of a force (of not more than 90 N or 20 lb-force) when applied at the knob or other latch-releasing device.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list those exit doors that do not conform where applicable. *

NOTE: This requirement does not apply if the existing door is approved and it does not endanger life safety, or is modified to provide life safety and is approved.

[2.7.2.2.(1)] For all other doors, locking, latching and other fastening devices can be readily opened to permit egress without requiring keys, special devices or specialized knowledge of the door opening mechanism on:

• every required exit door

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list exit doors that do not conform. *

• every door that opens into or is located within a facility that provides access to exit from a suite.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list the access to exit doors that do not conform. *

[2.7.2.1.(3)] Every door that opens into a corridor or other facility providing access to exit from a suite or room not located within a suite swings on its vertical axis.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list doors that do not conform. *

NOTE: Existing circumstances may be approved where the conditions do not endanger life safety or the door(s) is otherwise modified to provide for life safety and is approved.

10.0 EXIT SIGNS

Each guest suite has direct access through a door to the exterior of the building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 12.0. Where ‘No’ continue.

[9.9.3.10.(1) Exit signs are required to be installed in accordance with Subsection 3.4.5. of the 1994 Building Code.

The following reflect the requirements of Subsection 3.4.5.

[3.4.5.1.(1) and (7)OBC] Except for suite doors opening directly to the exterior, every exit serving the hotel has an exit sign placed over or adjacent to it.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

[3.4.5.1.(2) and (9)OBC] Every exit sign

• is visible from the exit approach,

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

• has the word EXIT or the words EXIT/SORTIE displayed in plain legible letters,

Agree:  Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

NOTE: If an exit sign with the word EXIT is installed in conformance with this Article, an additional sign displaying the word SORTIE is permitted to be installed.

• designed to be illuminated continuously while the building is occupied.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

[3.4.5.1.(3)OBC] Exit signs consist of red letters on a contrasting background (or a red background with contrasting letters), with the letters having a 19 mm stroke and a height of at least

• 114 mm when internally illuminated, and

• 150 mm when externally illuminated.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

[3.4.5.1.(4)OBC] Where illumination of an exit sign is provided from an electrical circuit, that circuit:

• serves no equipment other than emergency equipment,

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• is connected to an emergency power supply.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

[3.4.5.1.(5)] Signs are provided to indicate the direction of egress in public corridors and passageways,

• and have the word EXIT or the words EXIT/SORTIE with a suitable arrow or pointer indicating the direction of egress,

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

• and the size and colouring of lettering conforms to Sentence [3.4.5.1.(3)OBC] above.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list the locations that do not conform. *

11.0 INTERIOR FINISH

Each guest suite has direct access through a door to the exterior of the building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 12.0. Where ‘No’ continue.

One or more guest suites are served by an access to exit that involves a shared interior corridor.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where the response is ‘No’ this section does not apply, therefore proceed to Section 12.0. Where the response is ‘Yes’ continue.

[9.9.3.11.(1)] Interior finish materials on the walls and ceilings of exits and access to exits are required to be in accordance with Subsection 3.1.13. of the 1994 Building Code.

Section 11 provides useful information on the subject of interior finishes and outlines general requirements. Subsection 11.1 is used to complete the assessment and document conclusions.

For the purpose of this guide, interior finish is considered to consist of those materials or combinations of materials that form the exposed interior surfaces of the walls and ceilings of exits and access to exits. Typically a one storey building without a basement has exterior exit doors, and in some instances may contain an access to exit involving an interior corridor that serves more than one suite.

To provide rationale for limiting the combustibility of these finishes, the following paragraph was extracted from the NFPA Fire Protection Handbook. “Most building fires begin when decorative materials, furnishings or waste accumulations ignite, or when electrical systems or mechanical devices fail. Interior finishes are not usually the first items ignited, except when ignition occurs by overheated electrical circuits, careless use of plumbers’ torches, or direct impingement of flame from some other source, e.g. a candle or a match. After the fire has started and intensified, however, the interior finish can become involved and can contribute extensively to the spread of fire.”

For the purpose of this section of the Building Audit, interior finish material includes any material that forms part of the interior surface of a wall, partition or ceiling, such as:

(a) interior cladding of plaster, wood or tile,

(b) surfacing of fabric, paint, plastic, veneer or wallpaper,

(c) doors, windows and trim,

(d) lighting elements such as light diffusers and lenses forming part of the finished surface of the ceiling.

Flame spread tests are used to determine the surface burning characteristics of materials when exposed to a test fire. Flame spread test results are used to compare the surface burning characteristics of different materials. For example, cement-asbestos board and red oak flooring, which are used to calibrate the test furnace, have flame-spread ratings of 0 and 100, respectively. The higher the numerical flame-spread rating, the greater the flammability hazard will be.

The following table provides examples of various types of combustible materials and their corresponding flame-spread ratings.

Material/species

Flame-spread rating

Birch, Yellow

80

Brick

0

Cedar, Western Red

69

Douglas-fir

90

Fiberboard, Medium Density

167

Gypsum Wallboard

10-15

Gypsum Sheathing

15-20

Fiber-cement exterior materials

0

Hemlock, West Coast

73

Idaho white pine

82

Inorganic reinforced cement board

0

Maple

104

Masonite

<200

Oak, Red or White

100

Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

150

Particle Board

116-178

Pine, Lodgepole

98

Pine, Ponderosa

115

Plywood, Fire-retardant-treated construction

0-25

Plywood, Oak

125-185

Plywood, Pine

120-140

Spruce, Engelmann

55

The following table summarizes the flame-spread rating requirements of Subsection 3.1.13. of the 1994 Building Code as they apply to those requirements referenced in Article 9.9.3.11. of the Fire Code. This table is provided for convenience only. For accurate reference, refer to the actual Building Code requirements.

Location

Flame-spread rating of walls

Flame-spread rating of ceilings

Corridors serving guest suites in unsprinklered buildings

75, or

25 on the upper half of the wall and 150 on the lower half of the wall

25

Corridors serving guest suites in sprinklered buildings

150

150

11.1 Interior Finish In Exits And Access To Exits

Examine the existing interior finish of walls and ceilings of each access to exit that includes corridors not within a suite.

[9.9.3.11.(2)] Despite the Building Code requirements outlined in Section 11.0, interior finish materials on the walls and ceilings of access to exits are deemed to comply where:

• wood or other approved materials, treated with an approved fire retardant, is used on the walls of lobbies, foyers, vestibules, entrance halls and other major entrance areas,

• combustible interior finish, including paint, wallpaper and other interior finishes not more than 1.5 mm thick, is used on the walls of corridors,

• combustible materials that have a flame-spread rating of 150 or less are used on the walls and ceilings of access to exits if the access to exits are sprinklered. (Where applicable, the sprinkler system must conform to Article 9.9.5.4.)

Use the following table format to document the existing interior finish and to summarize your analysis of compliance or non-compliance.

Location

Interior finish examined

Descriptions of existing interior finish

Corridor serving guest suites

Wall cladding and surfaces

Ceiling cladding and surfaces

Doors, Windows and Trim

Lighting elements such as diffusers and lenses (NOTE 1)

NOTE:

(1) Light diffusers and lenses are permitted to have a flame-spread rating of up to 250, and can be located in fire-separated corridors (i.e. serving guest suites) provided they are individually not more than 1 m² in area and not less than 1.2 m apart.

12.0 LIGHTING

In this building each guest suite has direct access through a door to the exterior of the building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐.

Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 13.0. Where ‘No’ continue.

[9.9.3.13] Every exit and access to exit is equipped to provide illumination to an average level of at least 50 lx at floor level, and at all points such as angles and intersections at changes of level where there are stairs and ramps. Since it is not easy to determine 50 lx without a lux meter, the following is provided as a guide to determine compliance.

Illumination is provided in every exit and access to exit to the degree that people with normal vision can clearly see when walking without fear of tripping over or bumping into objects.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘No’ list areas that appear to lack adequate illumination. *

13.0 EMERGENCY LIGHTING

Emergency lighting is intended to provide illumination of interior exits and access to exits in the event the primary power supply to the building is interrupted.

This building is not more than 600 m² in building area and each guest suite has direct access through a door to the exterior, leading to ground level. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’, this section does not apply, therefore proceed to Section 14.0. Where ‘No’ was a response, continue.

In a building that is more than 600 m² in building area, each guest suite:

• has direct access through a door to the exterior, leading to ground level,

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

and

• is fire separated from adjacent rooms by walls that consist of reinforced concrete or masonry or have wall surfaces consisting of lath and plaster or gypsum board.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ is the response to both statements above this section does not apply, therefore proceed to Section 14.0. Where ‘No’ was a response, continue.

[9.9.3.14.(1)(a)] Emergency lighting is provided in every exit and access to exit in the building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list locations that do not have emergency lighting. *

Illumination from the emergency lighting provides an average of at least 10 lx at floor or tread level. Since it is difficult to determine the lighting level without a lux meter, as an alternative, the emergency lighting provides at least 1 watt/m² of floor space.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list locations that have inadequate illumination. *

The emergency lighting is supplied by a source of energy separate from the primary electrical supply for the building (i.e. batteries or electrical generator). Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ describe the source. *

The emergency lighting is designed to provide illumination for a duration of at least 30 minutes. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

The emergency lighting is automatically actuated when the power to the building is interrupted.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

14.0 UNIT EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY LIGHTING

[9.9.5.5.(2)] Emergency electric power serving emergency lighting that is not powered by a generator is required to be installed in conformance with CSA C22.2. No. 141, “Unit Equipment for Emergency Lighting”.

To assist in determining if the existing emergency lighting unit equipment conforms to this standard, examine the equipment to determine if it bears the following manufacturer’s marking or equivalent: “UNIT EQUIPMENT - CERTIFIED TO CSA STANDARD C22.2. NO. 141, AND RECOGNIZED BY SECTION 46, CANADIAN ELECTRICAL CODE PART 1”.

The unit equipment for emergency lighting is provided with the manufacturer’s marking as described above. (NOTE: Existing unit equipment for emergency lighting may be approved.)

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’, provide a description or the specifications relating to the existing unit equipment for emergency lighting. *

15.0 FIRE ALARM SYSTEM

Each guest suite has direct access through a door to the exterior leading to ground level.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 16.0.

Where one or more guest suites do not have direct access through a door to the exterior leading to ground level, the building is required to have a fire alarm system or, where permitted in certain buildings, a system of interconnected smoke alarms in lieu of a fire alarm system.

15.1 Interconnected Smoke Alarms

Where sleeping accommodation is provided for 10 people or less, the regulation permits interconnected smoke alarms to be installed and serve as an alternative to a fire alarm system (conforming to Subsections 15.3 through 15.14).

The building has sleeping accommodation for 10 people or less.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ Subsection 15.1 does not apply, therefore proceed to Subsection 15.2. Where ‘Yes’ continue.

• [9.9.4.1.(3)] )] The building is equipped with smoke alarms on or near the ceiling

o in corridors serving guest suites on each floor area,

o adjacent to each stairway serving the corridors,

o on or near the ceiling of the basement adjacent to each stairway, and

• one manual pull station is provided in each floor area in an approved location, and

• manual pull stations and smoke alarms are interconnected so that the actuation of either device will cause all smoke alarms to operate and be audible throughout the building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Section 16.0.

Where ‘No’ describe the degree of non-compliance: *

NOTE: Although interconnected smoke alarms are permitted, it is possible that the subject building is equipped with a fire alarm system consisting of a fire alarm system control panel and other devices such as manual pull stations, heat detectors, etc.

In this instance the building is equipped with a fire alarm system and not interconnected smoke alarms. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ proceed to Subsection 15.2.

Where the answer is ‘No’, as a minimum, interconnected smoke alarms must be installed as described above. Proceed to Section 16.0.

15.2 Buildings Requiring A Fire Alarm System

[9.9.4.1.(1)] Where the building has sleeping accommodation for more than 10 persons and one or more guest suites do not have direct access through a door to the exterior leading to ground level, the building is required to be equipped with a fire alarm system conforming to Subsections 15.3 to 15.14.

The building is equipped with an existing fire alarm system.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ the existing fire alarm system must conform to the provisions outlined in Subsections 15.3 through 15.14 as applicable.

Where ‘No’ the building is required to have a fire alarm system installed that conforms with the provisions outlined in Subsection 15.3 through 15.14. Document this deficiency and proceed directly to Section 16. *

15.3 Automatic Detection

Automatic fire detection is required to be provided in certain rooms and areas. The automatic detection requirements can be satisfied by having fire detectors installed in a manner outlined in Option #1 or by having the areas sprinklered in a manner consistent with Option #2.

Option #1

• [9.9.4.2.] Fire detectors are installed and connected to the building fire alarm system in every part of the building including elevator shafts and stair shafts.

NOTE: Detectors are not required in corridors, washrooms and closets in guest suites, saunas, refrigerated areas and swimming pools. Detectors can also be omitted from guest suites, but only where smoke detectors are installed in the corridor serving the guest suites.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Not applicable ☐ Where ‘No’ list areas of the building lacking fire detectors. *

Option #2

[9.9.4.2.(4) and OBC 3.2.4.16.(1), (3) to (5)] Fire detectors are not required in rooms and areas provided these areas are sprinklered and the sprinkler system activates the fire alarm system upon sprinkler system activation. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

The sprinkler system is electrically supervised to indicate a trouble signal on the building fire alarm system annunciator or fire alarm system control panel for each of the following (where applicable):

• movement of a control valve handle,

• loss of excess water pressure required to prevent false alarms in a wet pipe system,

• loss of air pressure in a dry pipe system,

• loss of air pressure in a pressure tank,

• a significant change in water level in any water storage container used for fire fighting purposes,

• loss of electrical power to any automatically starting electrical fire pump, and

• a temperature approaching the freezing point in any dry pipe valve enclosure or water storage container used for fire fighting purposes.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list those areas that apply and do not conform. *

NOTE: OBC Sentence 3.2.4.16.(2) is not applicable because Article 9.9.4.5. of the Fire Code dealing with annunciator requirements prevails. Refer to Fire Code Article 1.1.7.1. for details.

15.4 Manual Pull Stations

[9.9.4.3.] Requirements for manual pull stations:

Complies

Describe location(s) of non-compliance

Yes

No

installed at the main reception area

installed near every exit see NOTE (1)

red in colour

readily accessible and unobstructed

readily visible

installed at a height of not less than 1.2m and not more than 1.5m measured vertically from the finished floor

NOTE:

(1) A manual pull station may serve two exits where the exits are not more than 9 m apart, the exits are located on the same storey, and the pull station is readily accessible and visible from each exit.

15.5 Alarm Signalling Devices

[9.9.4.4.] Requirements for alarm signalling devices:

(bells, horns, etc.)

Complies

Describe location(s) of non-compliance

Yes

No

Installed on all storeys

 

Located so that the alarm signal and alert signal when sounded, may be heard throughout the building over all normal sounds at any time

Distinctive in sound

15.6 Annunciator Panels

The building exceeds a total area of 4000 m².

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 15.7.

Where ‘Yes’ complete the table below.

[9.9.4.5.] Annunciator requirements:

Complies

Describe location(s) of non-compliance

Yes

No

Installed near the main entrance, or in the main reception area and is readily accessible to the fire department

15.7 Fire Alarm Shutdown Of Recirculating Air Handling Systems

[9.9.4.6.] This subsection involves an examination of each heating and air conditioning system in the building to determine

• if the air handling system is of a recirculating type, and

• where it is of a recirculating type, if it is interlocked with the fire alarm system.

The building has at least one recirculating air handling system.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 15.8. If ‘Yes’ continue

The recirculating air handling system serves more than one guest suite.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 15.8. Where ‘Yes’ continue.

The fire alarm system shuts down the recirculating air handling system(s) upon activation.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ list the location of the recirculating air handling system(s) that does not comply: *

15.8 Trouble Signals

[9.9.4.7.] Fire alarm systems are electrically supervised whereby a fault condition, which would interfere with the operation of the fire alarm system, is detected. Once a fault is detected, typically an audible and visual trouble signal device must be provided.

A trouble signal sounding device is installed at the main reception area or a continuously supervised area.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ provide details of the variation. *

The fire alarm system trouble signal sounding device has a silencing switch.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to Subsection 15.9.

Where the response is ‘Yes’ a trouble light is installed at the main reception area or a continuously supervised area.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’, provide details of the variation. *

15.9 Fire Alarm System Operation

[9.9.4.8.] The fire alarm system must operate in conformance with Article 3.2.4.4. of the 1994 Building Code.

Fire alarm system operational requirements include:

Complies

Describe variances of compliance

Yes

No

[3.2.4.4.(1) OBC]

A single stage fire alarm system is installed in this building.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ proceed to next row.

(NOTE: A single stage fire alarm system wil,l upon the operation of any manual pull station or fire detector, cause an alarm signal to sound on all audible signal devices in the system.)

[3.2.4.4.(2) OBC] A 2 stage fire alarm system is installed in this building. Applicable: Yes ☐ No ☐

NOTE: A two stage fire alarm system:

(a) causes an alarm signal to sound in the initiating fire zone upon the operation of any manual pull station or fire detector,

(b) causes an alert signal to sound throughout the hotel and such parts of the building as is necessary to alert hotel staff.

(c) automatically causes an alarm signal to sound if the alert signal is not acknowledged within 5 minutes of its initiation,

(d) has each manual pull station equipped so that the use of a key or other similar device causes an alarm signal to sound and continue to sound upon the removal of the key or similar device from the manual pull station

[3.2.4.4.(3) & (4) OBC] The fire alarm system has zone coded signals.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ describe the operation of the system. *

NOTE: Zone coded signals indicate the zone of fire alarm origin using different alarm signal patterns that are known to staff.

15.10 Continuity Of Fire Alarm System

[9.9.4.9.] The building is served by only one fire alarm system. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Describe details of the variance: *

15.11 Electrical Supervision Of The Fire Alarm System

The primary design criterion of a fire alarm system is reliability, such that whenever called upon to actuate, the system will function.

Electrical supervision helps ensure this reliability. Electrical supervision is a means whereby a fault condition, which would interfere with the operation of the fire alarm system, is detected.

Any such fault condition in the wiring of the following system components, will initiate a trouble signal:

• Detection circuits,

• Signal circuits,

• Main and standby power supply, and

• Primary annunciator.

In addition, all relays or modules within the control panel are supervised against removal. Overcurrent protection devices are also supervised against interruption.

During any trouble occurrence, it may be possible to identify the following trouble indications at the control panel:

• AC power supply “On” or “Off”,

• System ground fault,

• Battery trouble,

• Detection circuit faults,

• Signal circuit fault,

• Auxiliary or Fire Department switches “Off”.

[9.9.4.10] Based upon the information provided above, it is determined that the fire alarm system is electrically supervised.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ describe details of variance: *

15.12 Emergency Power For The Fire Alarm System

[9.9.4.11.(1) & (2)] The existing emergency power supply provides supervisory power for not less than 24 hours and emergency power under full load for not less than 5 minutes at the end of the 24-hour period.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ describe details of variance: *

NOTE: Where ‘No’ the emergency power supply must be upgraded to comply with Article 3.2.7.8. of the 1994 Building Code.

15.13 Primary Power For The Fire Alarm System

[9.9.4.11.(3) & (4)] The fire alarm system primary source of power is provided by a separate circuit that is equipped with a separate circuit breaker or fuse switch located in a secure area.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ describe details of variance: *

When the building is not supplied with primary power from a public utility, the system is required to be equipped with two independent sources of power.

Applicable: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘Yes’ describe the power sources: *

15.14 Installation, Extension, Modifications To The Existing System

Should it become necessary to install, extend or modify the fire alarm system, the following standards and their respective requirements will apply to the installation, extension or modification.

In order to comply with subsections 15.3 to 15.14, the fire alarm system will have to be:

• Extended Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• Modified Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• Installed Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

[9.9.4.12.(1)] Where the fire alarm system is required to be installed, extended, or modified by Retrofit Section 9.9, the installation, extension or modification shall be in conformance with CAN/ULC S524, “Installation of Fire Alarm Systems”.

[9.9.4.12.(2)] Where a fire alarm system is required to be installed, extended or modified by Retrofit Section 9.9, the installation, extension or modification shall be verified in conformance with CAN/ULC S537, “Standard for the Verification of Fire Alarm Systems”.

If fire alarm system was installed, extended or modified after January 1, 2007, it was verified on this date: *

16.0 ACCESS FOR FIRE FIGHTING

[9.9.5.1.(1)] Access routes for fire fighting are required for certain sized buildings.

The building is less than 600 m² in building area. Agree: Yes ☐ No

Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 18. Where ‘No’ continue.

The building is sprinklered. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where ‘Yes’ this section does not apply. Proceed to Section 18. Where ‘No’ continue.

The existing access route

• has a clear width of at least 6 m, Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• is capable of supporting the expected loads imposed by fire fighting equipment and surfaced with concrete, asphalt or other material that provides accessibility under all climatic conditions, Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

• is located not less than 3 m and not more than 15 m from the principal entrance, Agree:  Yes ☐ No ☐

• and is connected with a public thoroughfare. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

17.0 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR A COMBUSTIBLE BUILDING EXCEEDING 1200 M² IN BUILDING AREA

The building does not exceed 1200 m² in building area. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

Where the response is ‘Yes’, this section does not apply. Therefore proceed to Section 18.0. Where ‘No’ continue.

The building exceeds 1200 m² in building area and is of combustible construction.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐ Where ‘No’ this section does not apply. Therefore proceed to Section 18.0. Where ‘Yes’ continue.

[9.9.2.3.(3)] Smoke detectors are provided in corridors serving guest suites.

Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

NOTE: Where the building is sprinklered, the smoke detectors are not required.

The building is sprinklered. Agree: Yes ☐ No ☐

18.0 TAKING THE NEXT STEPS

Where an item of non-compliance has been identified, it is the responsibility of the owner to comply with the regulation. As previously indicated, in some instances additional time is provided by the regulation to attain compliance. Refer to Appendix A – Regulation Compliance Schedule.

Where items of non-compliance have been identified and additional time is not provided by the regulation, it is the responsibility of the owner to take corrective measures without delay to comply with the regulation.

In a situation where a sprinkler system is being provided as an alternative to implementing one or more provisions as outlined in Subsection 5.1, Subsection 5.2, Subsection 6.1, Subsection 8.2, Subsection 11.1, Section 16.0, or Section 17.0, the system must comply with the provisions outlined in Article 9.9.5.4. In these cases, a sprinkler system contractor can be consulted to assist in the analysis of the existing system or design of a new system, where applicable.

Appendix A – Regulation Compliance Schedule for Single Storey Strip Motels/Hotels

Certain requirements impacting on hotel establishments are granted additional time in order to comply. The compliance dates for the applicable requirements are outlined in the following table. Items not listed in the table are required now and must be corrected immediately.

Column 1 identifies the requirement and the regulation numerical reference. Column 2 indicates the compliance date for the requirement as it applies to hotels or additions to hotels that were constructed after August 31, 1971. Column 3 indicates the compliance date for the requirement as it applies to hotels or portions of hotels constructed prior to September 1, 1971. Column 4 can be used to identify where work is required.

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Requirement

Hotel constructed after August 31, 1971

Hotel constructed prior to September 1, 1971

Applicable

Preparation and retention of a building audit by owner

9.9.1.2.

January 1, 2008

January 1, 2008

☐ Yes

Combustion air for fuel-fired appliances

9.9.2.12.(5)

July 1, 2008

July 1, 2008

☐ Yes

Smoke alarm installation in guest suites

9.9.4.13.

July 1, 2008

July 1, 2008

☐ Yes

Fire separation of guest suites

9.9.2.8.(1)

required now

January 1, 2010

☐ Yes

Self-closers on guest suite doors guest suite

9.9.2.8.(1)

January 1, 2010

January 1, 2010

☐ Yes

Fire separation of corridors serving guest suites

9.9.2.8.(2)

January 1, 2010

January 1, 2010

☐ Yes

Minimum distance between exits 9.9.3.3.(5)(6)

January 1, 2010

January 1, 2010

☐ Yes

Distance of travel to an exit within a floor area

9.9.3.5.

required now

January 1, 2010

☐ Yes

Fire dampers in ducts at fire separation 9.9.2.10.(7)(8)

January 1, 2012

January 1, 2012

☐ Yes

Dead end corridor limitations

9.9.3.2.(2)

required now

January 1, 2012

☐ Yes

Areas served by a dead end corridor

9.9.3.2.(3)

January 1, 2012

January 1, 2012

☐ Yes

Fire fighting access routes 9.9.5.1.

January 1, 2012

January 1, 2012

☐ Yes

Single storey building exceeding 1200 m²

9.9.2.3.

required now

January 1, 2012

☐ Yes

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Appendix B – Definitions

The words and phrases listed in the glossary have special meanings when they are used in the context of the regulation and subsequently this Building Audit guide. The underlined (hyperlinks) words and phrases contained in the definitions also have special meanings as defined in this glossary:

• Access to exit means that part of a means of egress within a floor area that provides access to an exit serving the floor area.

Alarm signal means an audible signal transmitted throughout a zone or zones or throughout a building to advise occupants that a fire emergency exists.

• Alert signal means an audible signal to advise designated persons of a fire emergency.

• Appliance means a device to convert fuel into energy, and includes all components, controls, wiring and piping required to be part of the device by the applicable standard referred to in this Code.

Approved means approved by the Chief Fire Official.

Assembly occupancy (Group `A') means the occupancy or the use of a building, or part thereof, by a gathering of persons for civic, political, travel, religious, social, educational, recreational or like purposes or for the consumption of food or drink.

Attic space means the space between the roof and the ceiling of the top storey or between a dwarf wall and a sloping roof.

Basement means a storey or storeys of a building located below the first storey.

Building means any structure used or intended for supporting or sheltering any use or occupancy.

Building area means the greatest horizontal area of a building above grade within the outside surface of exterior walls or within the outside surface of exterior walls and the centre line of firewalls.

Building Code means the Ontario Building Code made under the Building Code Act or a predecessor to that Act.

Building height (in storeys) means the number of storeys contained between the roof and the floor of the first storey.

Business and personal services occupancy (Group ‘D’) means the occupancy or use of a building or part thereof for the transaction of business or the rendering or receiving of professional or personal services.

Cellar means a basement that is more than 50 per cent below grade.

• Chief Fire Official means the assistant to the Fire Marshal who is the Municipal Fire Chief or a member or members of the fire department appointed by the Municipal Fire Chief under Subsection 1.1.8. or a person appointed by the Fire Marshal under Subsection 1.1.8.

Closure means a device or assembly for closing an opening through a fire separation such as a door, a shutter, wired glass or glass block and includes all components, such as hardware, closing devices, frames and anchors.

Combustible means that a material fails to meet the acceptance criteria of CAN4-S114, “Standard Method of Test for Determination of Non-Combustibility in Building Materials.”

Combustible construction means that type of construction that does not meet the requirements for noncombustible construction.

Contained use area means a supervised area containing one or more rooms in which occupant movement is restricted to a single room by security measures not under the control of the occupant.

• Dwelling unit means a suite operated as a housekeeping unit, used or intended to be used as a domicile by one or more persons and usually containing cooking, eating, living, sleeping and sanitary facilities.

• Existing means in existence on January 1, 2007.

Exit means that part of a means of egress, including doorways, that leads from the floor area it serves to a separate building, an open public thoroughfare or an exterior open space protected from fire exposure from the building and having access to an open public thoroughfare.

Fire compartment means an enclosed space in a building that is separated from all other parts of the building by enclosing construction that provides a fire separation having a required fire-resistance rating.

Fire damper means a closure that consists of a damper installed in an air distribution system or in a wall or floor assembly that is normally held in the open position and that is designed to close automatically in the event of a fire in order to maintain the integrity of the fire separation.

• Fire department means a group of firefighters authorized to provide fire protection services by a municipality, group of municipalities or by an agreement made under section 3 of the Fire Protection and Prevention Act.

Fire detector means a device which detects a fire condition and automatically initiates an electrical signal to actuate an alert signal or alarm signal and includes heat detectors and smoke detectors.

Fire-protection rating means the time in hours or fraction thereof that a closure, window assembly or glass block assembly will withstand the passage of flame when exposed to fire under specified conditions of test and performance criteria, or as otherwise prescribed in the Building Code.

Fire resistance means the property of a material or assembly in a building to withstand fire or give protection from it and is characterized by the ability of the material or assembly to confine a fire or to continue to perform a given structural function or both.

Fire-resistance rating means the time in hours or fraction thereof that a material or assembly of materials will withstand the passage of flame and the transmission of heat when exposed to fire under specified conditions of test and performance criteria, or as determined by extension or interpretation of information derived therefrom as prescribed in the Building Code.

Fire-retardant treated wood means wood or a wood product that has had its surface-burning characteristics, such as flame spread, rate of fuel contribution and density of smoke developed, reduced by impregnation with fire-retardant chemicals.

Fire separation means a construction assembly that acts as a barrier against the spread of fire and may or may not have a fire-resistance rating or a fire-protection rating.

Fire stop means a draft-tight barrier within or between construction assemblies that acts to retard the passage of smoke and flame.

Fire-stop flap means a device intended for use in horizontal assemblies that are required to have a fire-resistance rating and incorporate protective ceiling membranes and that operates to close off a duct opening through the membrane in the event of a fire.

Firewall means a fire separation of noncombustible construction that subdivides a building or separates adjoining buildings to resist the spread of fire that has a fire-resistance rating as prescribed in the Building Code and that has structural stability to remain intact under fire conditions for the required fire-rated time.

First storey means the storey with its floor closest to grade and having its ceiling more than 1.8 m above grade.

Flame-spread rating means an index or classification indicating the extent of spread of flame on the surface of a material or an assembly of materials as determined in the Building Code.

• Floor area means the space on any storey of a building between exterior walls and required firewalls and includes the space occupied by interior walls and partitions, but does not include exits and vertical service spaces that pierce the storey.

Flue means an enclosed passageway for conveying flue gases.

Guest suite means a single room or a series of rooms of complementary use providing sleeping accommodation for the travelling public or for recreational purposes in a hotel establishment.

Grade means the average level of finished ground adjoining a building at all exterior walls.

Heat detector means a fire detector designed to operate at a predetermined temperature or rate of temperature rise.

Heavy timber construction means that type of combustible construction in which a degree of fire safety is attained by placing limitations on the sizes of wood structural members and on thickness and composition of wood floors and roofs, by avoidance of concealed spaces under floors and roofs and by use of approved fastenings, construction details and adhesives for structural members.

High hazard industrial occupancy (Group `F' Division 1) means an industrial occupancy that contains sufficient quantities of highly combustible and flammable or explosive materials that, because of their inherent characteristics, constitute a special fire hazard.

Hotel means floor areas, a floor area or part of a floor area containing four or more suites that provide sleeping accommodation for the travelling public or for recreational purposes.

Hotel establishment means a building containing a hotel and all subsidiary occupancies that are operated in connection with the hotel and includes all connected or adjacent buildings that are operated in connection with the hotel.

Hyperlink means a link from one portion of a document to another location, activated by clicking on a highlighted word or image.

Impeded egress zone means a supervised area in which occupants have free movement but require the release, by security personnel, of security doors at the boundary before they are able to leave the area, but does not include a contained use area.

Industrial occupancy (Group `F') means the occupancy or use of a building or part thereof for assembling, fabricating, manufacturing, processing, repairing or storing of goods and materials.

Listed means equipment or materials included in a list published by a certification organization accredited by the Standards Council of Canada.

Means of egress means a continuous path of travel provided for the escape of persons from any point in a building or contained open space to a separate building, an open public thoroughfare or an exterior open space protected from fire exposure from the building and having access to an open public thoroughfare. Means of egress includes both exits and access to exits.

Major occupancy means the principal occupancy for which a building or part thereof is used or intended to be used, and includes the subsidiary occupancies that are an integral part of the principal occupancy.

Mezzanine means an intermediate floor assembly between the floor and ceiling of any room or storey and includes an interior balcony.

• Noncombustible means that a material meets the acceptance criteria of CAN4-S114, “Standard Method of Test for Determination of Non-Combustibility in Building Materials”.

Noncombustible construction means that type of construction in which a degree of fire safety is attained by the use of noncombustible materials for structural members and other building assemblies.

Occupancy means the use or intended use of a building or part thereof for the shelter or support of persons, animals or property.

Occupant load means the number of persons for which a building or part thereof is designed.

Partition means an interior wall 1 storey or part of a storey in height that is not load-bearing.

Public corridor means a corridor that provides access to exit from more than 1 suite.

Public pool means a structure, basin, chamber or tank containing or intended to contain an artificial body of water for swimming, water sport, water recreation or entertainment but does not include,

(a) pools operated in conjunction with less than six dwelling units, suites or single family residences or any combination thereof,

(b) pools that are used only for commercial display and demonstration purposes,

(c) wading pools,

(d) hydro-massage pools, or

(e) pools that serve only as receiving basins for persons at the bottom of water slides.

Residential occupancy (Group ‘C’) means the occupancy or use of a building or part thereof by persons for whom sleeping accommodation is provided but who are not harboured or detained to receive medical care or treatment or are not involuntarily detained.

Retrofit means the minimum performance requirements for life safety for existing buildings.

Service room means a room in a building used to contain equipment associated with building services.

Service space means space in a building used to facilitate or conceal the installation of building service facilities such as chutes, ducts, pipes, shafts or wires.

Smoke alarm means a combined smoke detector and audible alarm device that is designed to sound an alarm within the room or suite in which it is located when there is smoke within the room or suite.

Smoke detector means a fire detector designed to operate when the concentration of airborne combustion products exceeds a predetermined level.

Sprinklered (as applying to a building or part thereof) means that the building or part thereof is equipped with a system of automatic sprinklers.

Storey means that portion of a building that is situated between the top of any floor and the top of the floor next above it, and where there is no floor above it, that portion between the top of the floor and the ceiling above it.

Street means any highway, road, boulevard, square or other improved thoroughfare 9 m or more in width, that has been dedicated or deeded for public use, and is accessible to fire department vehicles and equipment.

Suite means a single room or series of rooms of complementary use, operated under a single tenancy, and includes dwelling units, individual guest rooms in motels, hotels, boarding houses, rooming houses and dormitories as well as individual stores and individual or complementary rooms for business and personal services occupancies.

Test means the operation of a device or system to ensure that it will perform in accordance with its intended operation or function.

Total area means the total area of all floors above and below grade, including mezzanines and penthouses, measured between the inside surfaces of exterior walls or between the inside surfaces of exterior walls and the inside surfaces of firewalls.

Travel distance means the distance from any point in a floor area to an exit measured along the path of exit travel, except that when floor areas are subdivided into rooms used singly or into suites of rooms and served by public corridors or exterior passageways, the distance shall be measured from the door of the rooms or suites to the nearest exit.

Vertical service space means a shaft oriented essentially vertically that is provided in a building to facilitate the installation of building services including mechanical, electrical and plumbing installations and facilities such as elevators, refuse chutes and linen chutes.

Walkway means a covered or roofed pedestrian thoroughfare used to connect 2 or more buildings.

Wave action pool means a public pool equipped with a means for inducing wave motion in the water.