Part 9

Division B

Part 9

 

9.5.2.6.

Q1:

 

Where a portion of a building is being used as a hotel and another portion is being used as an apartment, is a major occupancy fire separation required between the two occupancy types?

R1:

 

No. These are both residential occupancies and not considered different major occupancies requiring a major occupancy separation. However, Articles 9.9.2.8 and 9.5.2.7. of Division B require an adequate fire separation between residential hotel guest suites and dwelling units where they adjoin.

 

9.5.3.7.

Q1:

 

Is a fire escape required to comply with Article 9.5.3.7. of Division B if it is not needed to satisfy building exit requirements?

R1:

 

No, as long as the fire escape is not designated as an exit.

 

9.6.4.7.(2)

Q1:

 

Is the audibility level of voice communication systems addressed in Part 9 of the Fire Code?

R1:

 

Yes. The voice communication system must provide a verbal signal clearly heard in all occupied areas of the building and within the means of egress. The Ontario Fire Code does not specifically address the required sound level of a voice communication system. A voice communication system is not intended to alert the occupants to an emergency. It is used to transmit instructions to the occupants during a fire emergency after they have been alerted by the fire alarm system.

 

9.8.2.2.(1)

Q1:

 

In a two-unit residential building, where one unit occupies the 2nd floor, and the other unit the main floor and entire basement, does a fuel-fired appliance (i.e. furnace) located in the basement have to be enclosed in fire separated room?

R1:

 

No. Sentences 9.8.2.2.(1) and (2) of Division B require residential units to be fire separated from adjoining rooms and spaces by a fire separation having a 30 or 15 min fire-resistance rating. If the fuel-fired appliance is located in a space within a residential unit that is under the control of the occupant of that residential unit, no fire separation is required.

 

9.8.3.3.

Q1:

 

Can the principal means of escape for a redidential unit in a two-unit residential occupancy be through a shared space such as a laundry room or garage?

R1:

 

No. Sentence 9.8.3.3.(1) of Division B requires a means of escape to be separated from the remainder of the building by a fire separation having a 30 min. fire-resistance rating, the flame-spread rating of the interior wall and ceiling finishes within the means of escape to not exceed 150, and the means of escape to not enter another residential unit or occupancy and lead directly to the exterior, with direct access to ground level.

 

 

Q2:

 

Is it considered a ‘shared means of escape’ if the means of egress from a basement residential unit leads up stairs to a landing and then out a door to the exterior, and the upstairs residential unit has a door that opens onto this landing, providing an optional means of egress from this residential unit?

R2:

 

Yes. This arrangement would be considered a ‘shared means of escape’.

 

9.8.4.1.

Q1:

 

Some two unit residential buildings have been provided with separate electrical panels for each residential unit, to control the electrical circuits in each unit. Are required interconnected smoke alarms powered by a single 120 volt circuit from one of the panels an accepted practice under these circumstances?

R1:

 

Section 9.8 only requires that the sytem be connected to an electrical circuit with no disconnect switch between the overcurrent device and the smoke alarms. The installation still must comply with the Electrical Safety Code.

 

9.9.3.3.

Q1:

 

A hotel has guest suites in the basement. Two exits are required from the basement. One is provided. Each suite is provided with a window designed and located in accordance with Clauses 9.8.3.4. (2)(a) to (f), inclusive. Are these windows equivalent to providing a second exit from the basement?

R1:

 

No.