Part 2

Division B

Part 2

2.2.3.2.(1)

Q1:

 

What testing requirements apply to fusible links referenced in Sentence 2.2.3.2.(1) of Division B?

R1:

 

The Fire Code does not have ongoing test requirements for fusible links. Instead, it requires ongoing maintenance to ensure that they are operable at all times, undamaged and free of paint and dirt, as noted in Sentence 2.2.3.2.(1).

 

2.2.3.4.(3)(b)

Q1:

 

Does Clause 2.2.3.4.(3)(b) of Division B allow apartment doors opening into a corridor to be left open if the Fire Safety Plan contains provisions for the closing of these doors in the event of a fire?

R1:

 

No. Clause 2.2.3.4.(3)(b) waives the requirement to check that doors remain closed. It does not permit doors in separations to be left open.

 

2.3.2.1.(2)

Q1:

 

If spectator safety netting and netting suspended below ceiling insulation was in place in an arena prior to November 21, 2007, would it be exempt from the requirements of Article 2.3.2.1. of Division B?

R1:

 

Netting that was in place prior to November 21, 2007 would be exempt from the requirements outlined in Sentence 2.3.2.1.(1) of Division B provided it meets the high degree of flame resistance described in NOTE 4 of Test Method 27.1 of CAN2-4.2 "Textile Test Methods" referred to Sentence 2.3.2.1.(2) of Division B.

 

2.3.2.2.

Q1:

 

Can a fire official conducting an inspection require an owner to perform a match flame test?

R1:

 

No. While clause 19(6)(d) of the FPPA authorizes the inspector to conduct tests such as the match flame test and take and remove samples, the clause does not permit the inspector to require the owner to perform tests.

 

2.4.4.4.

Q1:

 

Does the use of a temporary or permanent outdoor fireplace (either masonry or metal) constitute open air burning?

R1:

 

Yes. Approval must be obtained from the local fire department prior to use of an outdoor fireplace. This requirement does not apply to an appliance that is in conformance with the Technical Standards and Safety Act, 2000, is for outdoor use and is installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

 

 

Q2:

 

With respect to open air burning, is all farm property exempt from Article 2.4.4.4. of Division B?

R2:

 

No. Article 1.3.1.1. of Division A exempts buildings and premises on a farm that are used for farming purposes and not as a residence from the requirements of the Fire Code. When a farm has no residence located on the property, all of the premises and buildings used for farming purposes are exempt from the requirements set out in the Fire Code. When a residence is located on the farm, the residence and a portion of the property immediately surrounding the residence is covered by Article 2.4.4.4. of Division B. The remainder, however, is exempt. The extent of the boundary around the residence is determined on a case-by-case basis or through a municipal burning by-law. Article 2.6.3.4. also applies when the burning is not considered an agricultural related operation.

 

 

Q3:

 

Does Article 2.4.4.4. of Division B prohibit the use of barbecues on balconies?

R3:

 

No. However, it does set out certain conditions for their use. A barbecue fire must be small, confined, supervised at all times and used to cook food. Other regulations such as those administered by the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) may have additional requirements. Their use may also be prohibited by condominium bylaws, as applicable.

 

2.4.7.1.

Q1:

 

What is meant by the term "unauthorized" in Article 2.4.7.1. of Division B?

R1:

 

The implication of unauthorized entry in a vacant building is someone who has not been given permission by the owner to enter, and who may either accidentally or intentionally cause a fire. The owner is permitted entry into his own building, and he may also cause other people to enter. These may include service people, or real estate agents, for example. The term "unauthorized" relates to the owner’s authorization, not the fire department’s.

 

 

Q2:

 

What is a ‘vacant’ building?

R2:

 

Although not defined in the Fire Code, the term "vacant building" is intended to refer to a building that is unoccupied, unattended and not in active use by authorized personnel. A vacant building is more susceptible to unauthorized entry and in turn is at greater risk of fire. Securing the building against such entry reduces the potential for fire.

 

2.6.1.13.

Q1:

 

Do service personnel need to be "properly trained and qualified" within the context of NFPA 96, "Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking", referenced in Article 2.6.1.13. of Division B?

R1:

 

No. For more information, please refer to the Office of the Fire Marshal technical guideline TG-03-2000, "Qualifications for Service Company Personnel" that provides guidance in this area.

 

2.7.1.4.

Q1:

 

How is the occupant load of an existing floor area in an assembly occupancy determined?

R1:

 

The occupant load of an existing floor area is calculated based on the floor area's use and available exit widths. The more restrictive calculation prevails. The calculation of occupant load on the basis of use involves dividing the floor area by the applicable "area per person" factors stated in Table 2.7.1.A. of Division B. The calculation of the occupant load on the basis of available exit widths involves dividing the aggregate width of access to exit or exit door openings (measured in millimetres) by the applicable "width per person" factors that are stated for access to exits and exits in the Ontario Building Code. Where a room or floor area has more than one egress or exit door, the door widths are added together prior to dividing by the "width per person" factor In addition, the calculation of occupant load on may vary from the aforementioned factors where the area has been designed for a different occupant load. To ensure that the maximum allowable occupant load does not reach a level where emergency egress is impeded, the Fire Code also places an overall "cap" on the occupant load. In the case of dining, alcoholic beverage and cafeteria space, at no time can the occupant load exceed the number calculated on the basis of 0.60 m2 of floor space per person. For all other uses, a 0.40 m2 of floor space per person is applicable. These limits are intended to prevent a situation where the occupants cannot properly access the means of egress due to the occupant distribution arrangement of the furnishings, even though the means of egress for the number of occupants is adequate.

 

 

Q2:

 

Should separate occupant load calculations be made for a space that is sometimes used as a banquet hall, dining area with tables and chairs and at other times a meeting room with row seating?

R2:

 

Yes. Where a floor area has multiple uses, different occupant loads should may be established and posted based on different "area per person" factors. For example when the floor area is used for dining, the occupant load may be calculated based on 1.1 m2 per person factor identified in Table 2.7.1.A. of Division B. When the floor area is used for meetings with nonfixed row seating, the occupant load may be calculated based on 0.75 m2 per person.

 

 

Q3:

 

In an arena with fixed seating capacity, can some aisles be used for standing room?

R3:

 

No. Aisles in an arena are intended for providing access to exit, and include stepped aisles between rows of seats, and converging aisles leading to exits located either at the bottom of the fixed seats and/or above the fixed seats. Aisles should not be used for standing or sitting as this is considered to be an obstruction.

 

 

Q4:

 

How should the occupant load be calculated when spaces used for different purposes exist within the same occupancy and at the same time (e.g. a restaurant that contains a stand-up bar)?

R4:

 

In this case, the calculation of occupant load on the basis of use would have to consider a "split" of the floor area between "standing space" and "nonfixed seats and tables". There must also be appropriate demarcation between the two uses. In spite of the calculations for this specific example the maximum occupant load is still limited to 0.60 m² of floor space per person because alcohol beverages are served here.

 

 

Q5:

 

How should the occupant load be calculated for a space containing a dance floor?

R5:

 

As per Sentence 2.7.1.4.(6) of Division B, the occupant load in this situation shall be based on that portion of the room that is not occupied by the dance floor except where the occupant load is determined using Subclause 2.7.1.4.(3)(b)(i) of Division B.

 

 

Q6:

 

How should occupant load be determined for a billiard hall?

R6:

 

The 9.30 m² per person factor identified in Table 2.7.1.A. of Division B should be used to calculate the space required for billiard tables. Separate calculations would be required for viewing, dining and other areas adjacent to the billiards area to determine a total load. In addition, limitations imposed by numbers of doors, available exit widths, access to exit arrangements, and the maximum occupant loadd based on Sentence 2.7.1.4.(7) of Division B would also apply.

 

2.7.1.7.(1)

Q1:

 

How far does a means of egress extend beyond an exit for the purposes of maintaining it free of obstructions as required by Sentence 2.7.1.7.(1) of Division B and what would be the minimum required width of this space?

R1:

 

Based on the definition set out in Article 1.4.1.2. of Division A, a means of egress is a continuous path of travel provided for the escape of persons from any point in a building. It includes both exits and access to exits and extends to the point where a person reaches a separate building, an open public thoroughfare or an exterior open space protected from fire exposure from the building and having access to an open public thoroughfare. The minimum required width of the exit door opening from the building would also apply to those areas beyond the building that provide access to an open public thoroughfare.

 

2.7.2.2.(1)

Q1:

 

Is the installation of two thumbturn latches on an exit door that does not require panic hardware acceptable under Sentence 2.7.2.2.(1) of Division B of the Fire Code?

R1:

 

No. Two thumbturn latches require more than one releasing operation and that is not permitted.

 

2.7.2.2.

Q1:

 

Is it permissible for shop owners to use either a dead bolt, chain and lock, or some other security measure on a required or designated exit door?

R1:

 

Yes, provided that the door can be opened with not more than one releasing operation and the hardware does not require keys, special devices or specialized knowledge to operate.

 

2.7.3.3.(5)

Q1:

 

What inspection and testing requirements apply to emergency lighting that consists of regular lighting connected to a back-up generator?

R1:

 

Inspection, testing and maintenance of the generator is regulated by Sentence 6.7.1.1.(1) of Division B. A separate requirement in Sentence 2.7.3.3.(5) of Division B requires inspection of the emergency lights. In the configuration where emergency lights also provide normal lighting in a building, inoperative lights are typically identified and repaired on a routine basis by building maintenance staff for the purpose of maintaining normal lighting levels. This routine inspection of lighting would satisfy the requirements of 2.7.3.3.(5).

 

2.8.2.1.(2)

Q1:

 

Is this provision intended to address individuals that may be trapped and require rescue?

R1:

 

No. This provision addresses persons who would require assistance to evacuate a building. It is not intended to address individuals that might be trapped by fire/smoke and thereby requiring rescue.

 

2.8.2.2.(2)

Q1:

 

What do the terms "available" and "on duty" mean with regards to supervisory staff in hotel establishments?

R1:

 

Within the context of Sentence 2.8.2.2.(2) of Division B, the term "available" is intended to mean being on the premises and the term "on duty" is intended to mean being awake/alert and on the premises.

 

2.8.2.5.(3)

Q1:

 

What type of material and size of lettering does the Fire Code require for the notice?

R1:

 

The Fire Code does not specify size of lettering, type of material used for the sign, or how the sign is to be fixed. This is to allow owners flexibility based on their own needs. The lettering should be sized such that someone can clearly read it when they are standing at arms length, and the material type and way it is fixed should be such that it cannot deteriorate nor be easily removed.

 

 

Q2:

 

What does the word "near" mean within the context of this Sentence?

R2:

 

The requirement states that the signage must be placed on the wall near the pull station. "Near" is not defined, but should be reasonably close so that when an occupant is close enough to operate the pull station, they are also able to read the procedures.

 

 

Q3:

 

Emergency procedures that are required to be posted as per Sentence 2.8.2.5.(1) have all the wording that is required by Sentence 2.8.2.5.(3). Can the emergency procedures be posted near each pull station in lieu of the notice that is required under Sentence 2.8.2.5.(3) and would that satisfy both Sentences?

R3:

 

Yes, however, this would require the emergency procedures to be posted at every pull station. Note that Sentence 2.8.2.5.(2) of Division B also requires emergency procedures to be posted at other locations as well.

 

2.14.1.

Q1:

 

Can a series of trailers on wheels located outdoors and used as a haunted house be considered an outdoor public amusement area regulated by Subsection 2.14.1. of Division B?

R1:

 

Yes. An outdoor public amusement area, by definition, includes entertainment displays or structures used on a temporary, seasonal or permanent basis.