OCC Inquest - Pryce 2016

Office of the Chief Coroner

Verdict of Coroner's Jury

Office of the Chief Coroner

The Coroners Act - Province of Ontario


Surname: Pryce
Given Name(s): Ian Glendon
Age: 31

Held at: Toronto, Ontario
From: April 4
To: April 21, 2016
By: Dr. John Carlisle, Coroner for Ontario
having been duly sworn/affirmed, have inquired into and determined the following:

Name of deceased: Ian Glendon Pryce
Date and time of death: November 13, 2013 at 1:57 p.m.
Place of death: 3437 Sherbourne Street, Toronto
Cause of death: Gunshot wound to the back
By what means: Homicide

(Original signed by: Foreperson and Jurors)


The verdict was received on April 21, 2016
Coroner's name: Dr. John Carlisle
(Original signed by coroner)


We, the jury, wish to make the following recommendations:


Inquest into the death of:

Ian Glendon Pryce

Jury Recommendations

To the Toronto Police Service:

  1. We recommend an amendment to the TPS 10-05 Incidents Requiring the Emergency Task Force, under Supervisory Officer #9 fourth bullet and Emergency Task Force #12 seventh bullet to read as follows:  Assess and consider the safety of civilians and officers throughout the incident; including identifying the location of civilians on or near the scene of a high risk incident, and securing their safety as soon as possible.
  2. The training of police officers should include the following: In situations in which a person contained by police officers is refusing to surrender but provides the name of a third party, the officers should immediately initiate an investigation, to determine if the third party can provide information and/or assistance that might help to resolve the situation.
  3. The training of police officers with respect to negotiations should include the following: In situations in which police officers recognize that there is a realistic possibility that they might employ lethal force against a person undergoing a mental health crisis who is contained by the officers, the officers should immediately seek assistance of a mental health professional.
  4. Provide formal training in basic negotiations for all new and current police officers.
  5. Upon joining the ETF individuals that demonstrate further interest and/or aptitude in negotiations should be provided with continuous advanced negotiator training such that each ETF team could have access to such a trained negotiator.
  6. Amend the Communications High Risk Incident Procedure to require a dispatcher to verbally notify officers on scene of important information and verify acknowledgement.
  7. Call taker training should be enhanced to ensure that no suggestion be made to a caller that risks personal safety and to review the flow of information from call taker to dispatcher.

To Toronto Police Service and Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services:

  1. A study should be undertaken to determine if improvements can reasonably be made in the technology available to enable negotiations to be heard by all officers involved in the incident and be recorded for use in future negotiation training. The study should include consideration of portable devices to allow remote communications at greater distances.
  2. To study emerging less-lethal technology and consider making these tools available to the Emergency Task Force.

To the Minister of Justice Canada:

  1. It is not currently an offence to possess a replica firearm, even though possession of one in certain circumstances may lead members of the public or law enforcement officials to react as if the replica firearm were capable of firing a projectile that is capable of causing serious bodily injury or death. Consideration should be given to regulating the acquisition/possession of replica firearms to reduce the risk of harm to the person possessing the replica firearm, members of the public and law enforcement officials.

To the Minister of Justice (Canada) and the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services (Ontario):

  1. There are firearms which are currently unregulated because they fire a projectile at a velocity of less than 500 feet per second. Possession or use of such firearms in certain circumstances may lead members of the public and law enforcement officials to react as if the firearm is one that is regulated. Consideration should be given to regulating the import/manufacturing/sale/possession and/or use of firearms that discharge a projectile at a velocity of less than 500 feet per second, to reduce the risk of harm to the person who has the firearm, members of the public and law enforcement officials.

To the appropriate Ministers with the Governments of Canada and Ontario:

  1. Require manufacturers to include a warning label on packaging of replica firearms and firearms which are currently unregulated to inform consumers that these products will be treated as real firearms by law enforcement.